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FAQs


Title IX

What is a Title IX Confidential Resource?

In most situations, Title IX Confidential Resources will not share received information with anyone else and will not report received information to the Title IX Office.

The following are exceptions to confidentiality that may be applicable in certain situations. In these situations, Confidential Resources will keep information as private as possible but may need to disclose information to others. These exceptions include: (1) a student shares intent to harm oneself or someone else; (2) a student shares information about current abuse or neglect of a minor or vulnerable adult; or (3) a court order orders disclosure.

The following are Title IX Confidential Resources available on-campus at UP:

All Health & Counseling Center Staff
Counseling and medical support
(503) 943-7134
hcc@up.edu

ProtoCall
After hours counseling support
(503) 943-7134 option 3 
 
ProvRN
After hours medical support
(503) 574-6520
 
Campus Ministry Priests & Lay Ministers
General support
(503) 943.7131
ministry@up.edu 
 
Holy Cross Religious Community Members
Does not include priests with University-wide administrative duties

More information about Title IX Confidential Resources is located in the Code of Student Conduct.

What is a Title IX Responsible Employee?

All UP employees (administrators, faculty, and staff) are Title IX Responsible Employees, unless they are specifically designated as a Title IX Confidential Resource. Responsible Employees will need to report received information to the Title IX Office.

More information about Title IX Responsible Employees is located in the Code of Student Conduct.

What can the University do to help UP students?

The University is committed to providing support to individuals affected by sexual or gender-based harassment, misconduct, or violence. The University’s goal is to support the well-being and safety of our community members. The following are types of support the University can provide to students. These are general examples and not an exhaustive list:

  • In-person support, through confidential and other resources;
  • Emotional, mental health, and general counseling support;
  • Medical support;
  • Information about restraining orders;
  • Information and processing of no-contact orders;
  • Information about academic accommodations, such as a change in one’s academic schedule or accommodations related to timing of class requirements;
  • Information about non-academic accommodations, such as a change in on-campus work schedule or alternative housing options;
  • Information about other on-campus or off-campus resources.
  • Information about the University’s Title IX processes, including processes related to information gathering and student conduct.

How can UP students access support?

Support can be obtained by contacting an on-campus or off-campus resource.

The two offices on campus that can most directly facilitate the providing of support, particularly in the areas of accommodations, are the Title IX Office and the Health & Counseling Center.

Please note that the Title IX Office will keep information as private as possible but may need to share with other University professionals to ensure campus safety and an appropriate University response. The Health & Counseling Center is a confidential resource; they will not share information with anyone else and will not report information to the Title IX Office, unless there is a specific situation limiting confidentiality.

For more information about accessing resources, please visit our Resources page.

If a student contacts the Title IX team for support or resources, does the student have to share details about their Title IX matter?

Students do not have to share details about their Title IX matters with the Title IX team, even those team members who are responsible employees and not confidential resources. Whether or not a student chooses to share details or particular information, the Title IX team will help explain relevant policies and processes, connect students to appropriate resources and accommodations as needed, and provide a supportive environment to students.

Can students obtain information from the Title IX team by sharing hypothetical information?

Yes, students may obtain relevant information about policies and processes by sharing hypothetical information

However, please note that the University has responsibilities to review and address a matter to the fullest extent possible if a matter involves imminent harm to safety or wellbeing. These types of situations may involve serious situations of potential harm involving physical safety and non-physical types of harm such as harassment. So, in certain situations the University may have to gather information as much as it is able to do so based on the hypothetical information. Of course, the lack of detailed or particular information may preclude the University from being able to conduct a full investigation and appropriately address the matter.

Can a UP community member make an anonymous Title IX report?

Individuals with concerns may make anonymous reports to the Title IX Office. Anonymity may mean that the reporting party does not identify themselves but does provide details about the situation of concern, including information about the individuals involved in that situation. Anonymity could also mean that the report does not identify some or all of the individuals involved in the situation. Please note that when an anonymous report is made, the University's ability to take appropriate steps may be limited because the University may be unable to gather the information necessary for such steps.

Making an initial anonymous report does not in any way prevent a student from choosing to follow up with additional information or changing their decision about anonymity in the future, if desired. The University welcomes community members sharing concerns, at such times and to the extent chosen by community members.

If a student makes a Title IX report, will the student get in trouble for other Code of Student Conduct policy violations related to the Title IX report?

To foster the safety and security of the entire community, the University encourages community members to report all incidents of sexual and gender-based harassment, misconduct, and violence. To encourage students to obtain resources and report incidents in this area, the University will not pursue the conduct process against a student who reports an incident of sexual or gender-based harassment, misconduct, or violence for lesser policy violations that occur in connection with the reported incident. Students who are interviewed as witnesses in such cases will also not be subject to the student conduct process for lesser policy violations that may have occurred related to the reported incident. Lesser policy violations are those involving areas such as intervisitation, alcohol, drug, or sexual intimacy.

However, conduct falling within sexual or gender-based harassment, misconduct, or violence is not a lesser policy violation. Being intoxicated or impaired by drugs or alcohol is never an excuse for sexual or gender-based harassment, misconduct, or violence.

What happens if the Title IX Office receives a report about a community member’s concerns?

When the Title IX Office receives the report, the Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Students will reach out to the reporting party to provide information about the Title IX process and available resources. Generally, if there is no indication of imminent harm to safety or wellbeing of the reporting party or other individuals, the Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Students will wait to hear from the reporting party about how they would like to proceed. If the next step selected by the reporting party requires the participation of the responding party, the Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Students will reach out to the responding party to provide information about the Title IX process and available resources.

In some cases, the Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Students may be unable to make a determination about whether there is imminent harm to the safety or wellbeing of the reporting party or other individuals, after meeting with the reporting party. In such cases, the Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Students or other Title IX team members may engage in information gathering (including potentially contacting the responding party and witnesses) so that the Title IX Office can make this determination.

Can a student bring a support person to Title IX meetings?

Students are welcome to bring a support person to Title IX meetings. Please note, it is respectfully requested that a support person provide support but not actively participate in Title IX meetings.

Who can serve as a support person?

Any individual willing to provide support to a student can serve as a support person, as long as the individual freely and willingly agrees and the student asking for support wants the person to serve as a support person. A support person can be a friend, family member, or a member of the student’s community(s).  It is requested that individuals employed by the University be mindful about potential conflicts with their job duties if/when agreeing to serve as a support person. The Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Students can speak with potential support persons about questions they may have about serving as a support persons, including how to assess and navigate potential conflicts.

Will the University always respect the wishes of the reporting party about how they wish to proceed with a Title IX matter?

The University will give as much deference as possible to the choice of the reporting party about how they wish to proceed. However, if there is potential imminent harm to the safety or wellbeing of the reporting party or other individuals, the University may need to proceed with information gathering and other responses appropriate to the situation, even if the reporting party has not chosen such next steps.

Imminent harm  to safety or wellbeing may involve serious situations of potential harm involving physical safety and non-physical types of harm such as harassment.

In all cases, the University will give consideration to the reporting party with respect to how the reported concern is pursued, but the University reserves the right, when necessary, to protect the community, and to investigate and pursue a resolution or response even when a reporting party chooses not to initiate or participate in those steps.

What happens if a reporting party wishes to proceed with the formal Title IX process?

If the reporting party wishes to proceed with the formal Title IX process, University representatives trained in conducting Title IX investigations will set up interviews with the reporting and responding parties and any witnesses. These representatives also will gather other relevant information necessary to determine what happened.

If the responding party is a student, all of the information gathered will be sent to Student Conduct. At that time, Student Conduct will convene a Title IX hearing panel, which consists of University professionals trained to conduct a Title IX hearing. The panel will review the information, get more information as necessary (such as from the reporting and responding parties and witnesses), and then make a determination about whether there was a violation of the Code of Student Conduct.

If a reporting party decides to take the formal Title IX process, can they change their mind later?

If the informal resolution process is applicable, the reporting party can select the informal resolution process even after starting the formal process. However, in this situation, the responding party would need to agree to the informal resolution process. Please note that some types of matters, involving sexual assault and more serious matters involving sexual misconduct, cannot be appropriately adjudicated through an informal process.

Are parents informed about Title IX reports?

Parents are not informed about Title IX reports. Students may inform their parents, guardians, or family members, but this decision is left to students.

Is the Portland Police Department or other law enforcement agency(s) notified about Title IX reports?

Generally, the University does not notify the Portland Police Department or other law enforcement agency(s) about Title IX matters. This decision is left to the reporting party and/or individuals who experienced the situation of harm. It is important to the University that we respect the autonomy and choices of individuals who have experienced situations of harm. However, the University does not have armed law enforcement officers. Therefore, for any situation involving an emergency or urgent/immediate threat to safety requiring law enforcement assistance, the University would contact the Portland Police Department.

How long does the Title IX process take?

Generally, once the Title IX Office receives a report, a Title IX team member will contact the reporting and responding parties (if identified) by the next business day. The Title IX team tries to meet with all parties as soon as possible but this may be delayed depending on the schedule, availability, and responsiveness of the parties.

If a formal process is started, the Title IX Office investigators will investigate and Student Conduct will hold a hearing in a manner that is prompt and as diligent as possible. Generally, the University tries to finish these processes within 60 days. However, this process may take longer depending on the schedule, availability, and responsiveness of the parties and witnesses, as well as the amount and extent of the information that is relevant and gathered.

What can the University do to help UP employees?

University employees who need information or support should contact the Human Resources Office at hr@up.edu or (503) 943-8484. For confidential support, employees should contact the Employee Assistance Program at cascadecenters.com or (800) 433-2320.